Caribbean Information

The name “Leeward Islands” derives sichvon the prevailing wind direction in these latitudes of the northeast trade wind, the lasting influence on the climate in this part of the Lesser Antilles.

Location

The Leeward Islands extend in an arc from Puerto Rico to the southeast over a total area of 12,000 square kilometers. These include the Virgin Islands, Anguilla, Sint Eustatius, Sint Maarten – Saint-Martin, Saint-Barthélemy, Saba, Barbuda, St. Kitts and Nevis, Antigua, Montserrat, Guadeloupe, Marie-Galante (to Guadeloupe), Aves, Dominica, Martinique, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenadines (to St. Vincent and the Grenadines), Grenada (independent) and Barbados (independent).  Visit shoe-wiki for Guadeloupe Tour Plan.

Time zone

The time difference when traveling from Germany to the Lesser Antilles is between -6 and -4 hours, depending on the travel time and the exact destination .

Geography

The Leeward Islands include 20 islands, most of which are of volcanic origin. The wind direction of the northeast trade wind ensures a humid climate and precipitation over 2,000 mm.

Flora and fauna

The Lesser Antilles offer an enchanting natural and animal world on every island : Due to the year-round high temperatures, lush flora are favored. Several thousand species of plants bloom on the islands, Dominica alone produces around 188 different species of fern. The fauna of the Lesser Antilles and the Leeward Islands is particularly characterized by the great diversity of birds. In Guadeloupe, for example, you can find sugar birds, hummingbirds and water fowl. Population

The residents are mainly of Afro-American origin, the much smaller part has its roots in Europe or Asia. The majority of the population professes Christianity. Usually English or Spanish is spoken on the individual islands, but some residents still speak different forms of the Creole language

Frequently asked questions about Caribbean

What are the entry requirements for the Lesser Antilles over the Leeward?

German citizens do not need a visa to enter Dominica, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines and stay for up to 90 days. The passport must be valid for 6 months after the trip. Air travelers should be in possession of an onward or return flight ticket. German nationals can enter Guadeloupe and Martinique with a valid passport or ID card without a visa.

What vaccinations do you need to travel to the Lesser Antilles over the Leeward?

When entering St. Vincent and the Grenadines directly from Germany, vaccinations are not required. A valid vaccination against yellow fever is required for all travelers older than 12 months when entering from a yellow fever area. In addition, vaccination protection against tetanus, diphtheria, whooping cough (pertussis) and hepatitis A is recommended for stays in St. Vincent, and hepatitis B and typhoid fever if the stay is longer than four weeks. Compulsory vaccinations for entry to St. Lucia and Dominica are not mandatory, except for those entering from so-called yellow fever endemic areas – here a yellow fever vaccination should be verifiable. For short trips we recommend vaccination against hepatitis A, tetanus and diphtheria. Protection against hepatitis B and typhus is recommended for long-term stays. When traveling to Martinique and Guadeloupe, vaccination against tetanus, diphtheria and hepatitis A is recommended. For a longer stay and backpacking trips, vaccination against hepatitis B and typhus is recommended. A yellow fever vaccination certificate is required from travelers (older than one year) who have been in a yellow fever infection area within the last 6 days when entering the country. We definitely recommend taking out health insurance abroad with repatriation. who were in an area infected with yellow fever in the last 6 days when they entered the country. We definitely recommend taking out health insurance abroad with repatriation. who were in an area infected with yellow fever in the last 6 days when they entered the country. We definitely recommend taking out health insurance abroad with repatriation.

Caribbean Information

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