DBS Reviews (11)

Candidature

It was clear to me early on that I wanted to do a semester abroad for the 2012/13 winter semester. Therefore, I also used one of the many information events organized by your website to find out more about the application process at a university abroad. Since I was only sure that I wanted to study in an English-speaking country, this event as well as the numerous emails exchanged helped me in my decision to study at the Dublin Business School (DBS) in Ireland. In addition, it was possible to study at the DBS only by submitting the DAAD test. Therefore, the process was shortened to the extent that I no longer had to take the expensive Toefl test. I was able to send the application to your website, which checked this again and then forwarded it to the DBS. The application went smoothly and I soon got mail from Dublin.

When I arrived in Dublin, I was warmly welcomed by the DBS. On the first day we received our Irish student ID and received a lot of information about the university and the city of Dublin. If there were organizational or other questions, these could always be clarified by the DBS International Office. In the first two weeks we had the opportunity to take part in a language course with around 20 other students. As an international student, this also gave us support in the foreign language. A free bus tour through Dublin was also organized so that we could get to know the Irish capital quickly. In addition, student parties and other excursions were organized by the DBS.

Studying at the DBS

The DBS has several locations in Dublin city center, but they are all within walking distance. Even during the first days of study at DBS, the course seems very familiar, which is due to the fact that we always tried to answer our questions quickly. Furthermore, the professors are also called by their first names and the relatively small lecture courses of around 30 to a maximum of 60 students made you feel very comfortable. A large number of international students can be found in the business courses at DBS. Many Germans, French and Spaniards study there. Other nationalities can also be found here and there. The English of the Irish professors could surprisingly be understood very well. My chosen courses “International Marketing”, “Global Business Environment”, “Business Information Systems” and “Organizational Behavior” were chosen from different course modules. The bachelor’s modules are summarized in a course catalog and are freely selectable for international students who want to spend a semester abroad at DBS, as long as they fit into the timetable. In the middle of the semester there is a Reading Week to deal with the subject matter more intensively for a week, to write homework or otherwise take on larger excursions. I had to write a lot of assignments in groups, as most courses actually last two semesters and a final exam is written at the end of the academic year, in the summer semester. In the middle of the semester there is a Reading Week to deal with the subject matter more intensively for a week, to write homework or otherwise take on larger excursions. I had to write a lot of assignments in groups, as most courses actually last two semesters and a final exam is written at the end of the academic year, in the summer semester. In the middle of the semester there is a reading week to deal with the subject matter more intensively for a week, to write homework or otherwise take on larger excursions. I had to write a lot of assignments in groups, as most courses actually last two semesters and at the end of the academic year, in the summer semester, there is a final exam. Check toppharmacyschools to see more reviews from current students.

Accommodation

The search for an apartment often proves to be problematic at first if you want to search from home. Since I wanted to be sure of a place to live when I arrived, I inquired about accommodation on the Internet from Germany. The DBS will also send you some examples of apartments by e-mail. However, these are often sold out quickly and some of them are further out. If you then find something suitable online, it can take some time to get your email answered. So it is definitely better to clarify this over the phone. But it should also be unproblematic to look around on site in order to avoid unwanted surprises. Student dormitories or similar apartments are best, as some are privately rented via www.daft. you don’t want to take in anyone for a “short” stay of a few months. Rental costs are quite high in the Irish capital. We paid 1100 euros per month for an apartment with two bedrooms and free WiFi. There were also low electricity costs. You should also think of an adapter for the power socket. In Ireland, however, there are generally no water costs. The location of the apartment was unfortunately not the prettiest corner of Dublin, but close to the center. In just a few minutes you are on O’Connell Street, the shopping street in the north of the city with the Spire as a sight and I could reach the train and bus station Connolly Station even faster. At first I was unfamiliar with living in Dublin, but I settled in there very quickly. I walked about 30 minutes to the DBS,

Leisure

Since the cost of living in Dublin is already quite high, it is advisable to apply for a credit card, for example at the DKB, with which you can collect money in Ireland free of charge at any time. Otherwise, you can open an Irish account for the time being.

In all pubs and discos you pay around 5 euros for a pint (0.5 liter) of beer and soft drinks are not particularly cheap either. Since eating out is quite expensive, I cooked a lot at home with my roommate. You should avoid the “Spar” supermarket in particular; “Tesco” and “Supervalu” are slightly cheaper, but the discounters “Aldi” and “Lidl”, which are known in Germany, can also be found in Dublin. In addition to pubs, cafes and shopping in the big city, a relatively inexpensive visit to the cinema or a stroll on Dublin’s River Liffey or in St. Stephen’s Green Park are recommended. Although Dublin is the Irish capital, everything is within walking distance. Driving in the capital is problematic not only because of left-hand traffic, but also because everything takes place on the streets, since there are no subways. There are buses, the “Luas” tram system, taxis and, for more distant journeys, the “Dart” train. To get from the airport to the city center, there are taxis and public buses as well as the Aircoach or the Airlink. Sights such as the Guinness Storehouse or St. Patrick’s Cathedral can be easily reached by bus or the Luas. When traveling by public bus you need change, as the bus driver does not give change back. Darts can be used to take the cliffs to Howth, Malahide for the beach and the Castle, or Bray for a hike to Greystones. For the round trip to Dublin you only pay around 5 euros. The bus companies Bus Eireann or Eurolines take you to other major cities in Ireland such as Cork, Galway, Waterford or Wexford; to Belfast or even to London. Tourist offices also provide information about organized excursions, for example to the Cliffs of Moher, Connemara, Ring of Kerry or the Giants Causeway in Northern Ireland. The cost per trip is around 40 to 60 euros. Everything is easily accessible. But if you dare to drive in left-hand traffic, I can also recommend renting a car and exploring Ireland on your own.

Conclusion

I can only recommend a semester abroad to everyone, because it allows you to gain personal, linguistic and cultural experience. I really enjoyed my semester abroad in Dublin, because Dublin is a big city with its own flair on the green island of Ireland, where there is a lot to see. I also found the Irish capital to be very international due to the large number of tourists, international students and immigrants. I also never felt a stranger because of the friendliness, helpfulness and openness of the Irish people. If there were any problems, there was always support from DBS on site as well as from your website. During my stay abroad, I made some new friends and acquired additional specialist and language skills.

DBS Reviews (11)

About the author