Mexico Literature in the Mid-nineteenth Century

A multiplicity of literary forms appears overall in the mid-nineteenth century, and there is a leaven of interests and problems in the more general life of culture, which find full correspondence in the articulated and for some time turbid terrain of political and civil struggles. The constitutional project of 1857 – the so-called “Reforma” – permeated and penetrated all the literature which also became a party weapon, with that generous ferment of immediate sentimental reaction and with that superficial and transient empiricism that it itself entailed. In the new vicissitudes, liberal and democratic romanticism found its happiest moments, and the heroism that it exalted in poetry was accepted and implemented on the streets and squares, during the revolts, in front of the platoons of Gil Gómez el Insurgente. The voices of history and political passion burst into art with the most diverse attitudes; the writer is at the same time a man of government and action, soldier and educator, poet and polemicist, as at the dawn of a civilization: he is a gradation of activity and expressions, ranging from the acrid and impetuous satire of Ignacio Ramírez (1818- 1879), anticlerical and Volterrian, cruelly demolition and with severe historical ideals, to the more rested but equally realistic and disenchanted prose of Ignacio Mexico major liberal organ (El correo de Mexico), with university teaching, and especially with his art as a psychologist and moralist who hides behind a social and religious skepticism. It is a question of a very widespread pessimistic awareness, especially in the years of the unfortunate fate of Maximilian of Austria, without faith and dominated by an obscure fatalism of nature and society; as is revealed in the gaunt and crude expression of Manuel Acuña (1849-1873), who committed suicide not yet twenty-five, after having sung with gloomy desolation the death without awakening and without the afterlife (Ante un cadaver) and the instincts and environments that they ensnare the soul and will of man (El Pasado): not without claiming to also give a scientific and sociological demonstration of it. For Mexico 1998, please check constructmaterials.com.

It is the foundation, in fact, of Mexican literature to adapt and almost merge into the concreteness of life that flows, with such penetrating tenacity, that often one cannot discriminate, especially in the art of prose, the fantastic element from pure news. From these aptitudes to reproduce the robust and multifaceted reality of history, the Mexican novel has developed, with its wide and varied tradition, always new in content if not always renewed in trends, and ready to portray the events, problems, dreams of his troubled land. Poets are rare who have not also attempted narrative prose; in it the best spirits were tested, who understood it as an interpretation of their time. Even within the different schools – sentimental, historical, naturalist, psychological, autobiographical, symbolist – the art of storytelling builds and makes itself with a rhythm and color that are generated directly from contemporary life.

The masterpiece of José J. Fernández de Lizardi (1771-1827), who until then had penetrated the most essential and most current aspects of the soul, has repercussions in tradition, even if after many years and with different intentions. Mexican, albeit stylized in a realistic and picaresque vision. Indeed the trace of his famous albeit years later and with different intentions, the masterpiece of José J. Fernández de Lizardi (1771-1827), who until then had penetrated the most essential and most current aspects of the Mexican soul, albeit stylized in a realistic and picaresque vision. Indeed the trace of his famous albeit years later and with different intentions, the masterpiece of José J. Fernández de Lizardi (1771-1827), who until then had penetrated the most essential and most current aspects of the Mexican soul, albeit stylized in a realistic and picaresque vision. Indeed the trace of his famousPeriquillo Sarmiento is taken up by Manuel Payno (1810-1894), in a series of Mexican types and paintings, treated with a fantasy between naturalistic and sensational, tempered by a delightful humorous flair (El Fistol del diablo, Bandidos de Río Frío, etc..). More serious is Luis Gonzaga Inclán (1816-1875), who introduced in Astucia, with a wealth of tones and colors, entire strips of purely local life and landscape; while the easy and witty prose of José T. de Cuéllar (1830-1894) takes up the caricatural and sly manner, with hints of irony and humor, which also extends to the idiomatic elements. The art of Justo Sierra “senior” (1814-1861), who still smacks of leyendahistorical, with certain confessional concerns (La hija del Judío), it becomes more sentimental as we move into the nineteenth century: F. Orozco y Berra (1822-1851), almost autobiographical, Florencio del Castillo (1828-1863), of feminine temperament, Pantaleón. Tovar (1828-1876), with a familiar and bourgeois tenderness, are the clearest representatives, even though their voice is overwhelmed by the more square and more corpulent historical-social novel into which life entered without lyrical solitudes., but in its full dramatic bloom.

Mexico Literature in the Mid-nineteenth Century

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